A pre-trial collection and investigation of what perceptions and attitudes of Konglish exist amongst foreign and Korean English language teachers in terms of English education in Korea

| March 25, 2010
Title
A pre-trial collection and investigation of what perceptions and attitudes of Konglish exist amongst foreign and Korean English language teachers in terms of English education in Korea

Keywords: Konglish, English education, Standard English, lingua franca native speaker, perceptions

Authors
Colin McDonald
Canada-Vietnam Foreign Language Centre

Scott McRae
Canadian Education Placement and Support

Bio Data
Colin McDonald: After leaving Canada in 1998, I came to South Korea and started my English language teaching career. Although I started out in children s education, I readily moved into adult education, mostly at the university level. In 2008, I moved to HCMC, Vietnam, and am currently the Deputy Director (Academics) for the Canada-Vietnam Foreign Language Centre (CVC). The CVC is dedicated to enhancing the English proficiency of Vietnamese students and improving the teaching methods of Vietnam s public school teachers by working with various educational institutions in Canada.

Scott McRae: For over 10 years, I worked as an ESL instructor in S. Korea, focusing on adult education. After teaching at the university level for six years, I returned to Canada to work at the immigrant serving organization Centre for Newcomers, facilitating workshops for recent immigrants to Canada, with a specialization in cultural communication skills in the workplace. Currently, I am also part owner of Canadian Education Placement and Support, recruiting international students to study in Canadian middle and high schools.

Abstract
This paper is a pre-trial collection and investigation of the perceptions that selected foreign and Korean English teachers have of Konglish in relation to English education in Korea. The knowledge gained in this pre-trial will help English educators, both Korean and foreign to 1) to get a better understanding of both groups of teachers view of Konglish as it relates to issues of identity and ownership, and 2) make for more informed teaching judgments concerning the use of Konglish in the classroom. Furthermore, this study will help in closing the communication gap that exists between native English speaking teachers and Korean English teachers by clearly illustrating their viewpoints of issues of Konglish and what they are based on.

[private]

See page 134-164

Download PDF

[/private]

Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 12 Issue 1