Digital Storytelling: Integrating Language and Content in the Training of Pre-service Teachers

| December 3, 2013
Title
Digital Storytelling: Integrating Language and Content in the Training of Pre-service Teachers

Keywords: CLIL, Digital Storytelling, process writing approach, proficiency, methodology

Authors
Linda Mary Hanington,
Anitha Devi Pillai &
Kwah Poh Foong
National Institute of Education,
Nanyang Technological University,
Singapore

Bio Data
Linda Hanington is a teacher and teacher educator with extensive experience in Europe and Southeast Asia. She particularly enjoys helping learners improve their listening and speaking skills and is interested in using relevant authentic materials to support language development. She is currently working at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Anitha Devi Pillai is a teacher educator at the National Institute of Education (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore). Her doctoral thesis focused on the discourse structures of student teachers’ research papers and their acculturation practices to academic writing. Currently, she is co-investigating ‘Teacher and student perceptions of peer review in the argumentative essay writing classroom’ and ‘The impact of information seeking behavior on student research papers’. Her research interests are in the areas of writing pedagogy, text-analysis of student papers and the development of written tests/tasks.

Kwah Poh Foong is a teacher educator at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University and has extensive experience in teaching writing to students at the tertiary level. Her current research interest is on the effectiveness of feedback on student teachers’ written work.

Abstract
This article discusses a Digital Storytelling course that is used as a means to promote pre-service teachers ’own language proficiency and at the same time develop their awareness of teaching techniques they can later adopt in their own classrooms. It looks at how three teacher educators at the National Institute of Education, Singapore interpreted the course and at how content, in this case teaching ideas and approaches, was integrated with activities promoting language development. The three teacher educators describe the conceptualization of the course, which takes a project- and task-based approach and blends in class and online modes, how links between the language focused activities the participants experienced and methodologies were made more explicit, and how a process writing approach was actualized. They also consider the wider applicability of this interpretation of CLIL in the training of language teachers.

[private] See page: 231-247

Download PDF

[/private]

Category: Teaching Articles, Volume 15 Issue 4