EFL Teachers’ Attitudes toward Communicative Language Teaching in Taiwanese College

| July 20, 2011
Title
EFL Teachers Attitudes toward Communicative Language Teaching in Taiwanese College

Keywords: Communicative Language Teaching, Communicative Approach, EFL, Teachers attitudes

Authors
Ming Chang
Minghsin University of Science and Technology Taiwan

Bio Data
Ming Chang was born in Tainan, Taiwan. She earned her Ed.D. from Texas A & M University Kingsville in USA. Now she is an Assistant Professor in Language Teaching Center at Minghsin University of Science and Technology in Taiwan. Her research interests include TEFL and EFL teacher training.

Abstract
Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) advocates teaching practices that develop learners abilities to communicate in a second language. It represents a change of focus in language teaching from linguistic structure to learners need for developing communication skills. In recent decades, many English as Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms have adopted CLT into their curricula. The study is motivated by the review of previous literature showing that although teachers attitudes play a crucial role in revealing their thinking about CLT and their implementation of CLT in the classrooms, few studies have focused on teachers attitudes toward CLT in a particular EFL setting, Taiwan. The study aimed at investigating Taiwanese college teachers attitudes toward CLT and the reasons behind attitudes the teachers held toward CLT.

An explanatory mixed method was used in the study. It was a two-phase research design, starting with quantitative data collection and analysis, followed by qualitative data collection and analysis. The qualitative phase was used to explain the results of the quantitative phase. The results of this study indicated that the teachers held favorable attitudes toward principles of CLT and displayed characteristics of CLT in their beliefs. Also, the results demonstrated that Taiwanese college English teachers believe CLT can make English teaching effective and meaningful

 

See pages 17-34

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Category: Teaching Articles, Volume 53