E-learning Constructive Role Plays for EFL Learners in China‟s Tertiary Education

| August 20, 2011
Title
E-learning Constructive Role Plays for EFL Learners in China‟s Tertiary Education

Keywords: CALL, E-learning, Constructivism, Scaffolding, Role Play

Authors
Lin Shen
Suranaree University of Technology, Thailand
Jitpanat Suwanthe
Suranaree University of Technology, Thailand

Bio Data

Mr. Lin Shen is currently a Ph.D. candidate in School of English, Institute of Social Technology, Suranaree University of Technology, Thailand. His main research interests are second language speaking, computer-assisted language learning and elearning.

Dr. Jitpanat Suwanthep is a lecturer in English at Suranaree University of Technology,
Thailand. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, USA. Currently, she is the graduate testing coordinator for the SUT English Proficiency Test. Her interests include second language writing, ESP curriculum development and e-learning

Abstract
Recently, speaking has played an increasingly important role in second/foreign language settings. However, in many Chinese universities, EFL students rarely communicate in English with other people effectively. The existing behavioristic role plays on New Horizon College English (NHCE) e-learning do not function successfully in supplementing EFL speaking classes. The present study aims at investigating the implementation of constructive role plays via NHCE e-learning and its effect on Chinese EFL learners‟ speaking in college English classes. Speaking pretests and post-tests, student role play recording analysis, student questionnaires, and student interviews have been employed to collect data during the 18-week instruction period. Results show that the e-learning constructive role plays have positive effects on improving students‟ speaking in terms of language quality and language production, and students express positive opinions towards the implementation of e-learning constructive role plays. The findings from this study are directly beneficial to other researchers aiming at developing students‟, as well as teachers’, L2 speaking instruction.

 

See pages 4-29

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Category: Teaching Articles, Volume 54