Integrating Input Enhancement and Processing Instruction in Promoting Acquisition of English Phrasal Verbs

| March 24, 2012
Title
Integrating Input Enhancement and Processing Instruction in Promoting Acquisition of English Phrasal Verbs

Keywords: Processing instruction, visual cues, textual enhancement, English phrasal verbs

Authors
Yueh-Tzu Chiang
Cardinal Tien College of Healthcare & Management, Taiwan

Bio Data
Yueh-Tzu Chiang holds a BA from Tamkang University, Taiwan, an MA TEFL from the University, of San Francisco, USA and is currently enrolled in the doctoral program in Tamkang University. She now works as an English language lecturer in Cardinal Tien College of Healthcare & Management in Taiwan where she teaches general English, English reading and writing for undergraduates. Her research interests focus on second language vocabulary acquisition, learning strategy and language awareness.

Abstract
This study discusses how visual input and textual enhancement, combined with processing instruction (VanPatten, 1996, 2004a, 2004b etc.), facilitates the learning of English phrasal verbs for Chinese learners of English. English phrasal verbs have long been a confusing structure for EFL/ESL learners, partly because of their random combination of verb and particle, but also because of their manifestation of polysemy. Traditional teaching and learning methods are memorization of words and output- oriented drills to deal with their grammar issues, entailing (in)transitivity and particle position, etc. Two instructional packages, Traditional Instruction (TI) and Rote Rehearsal (RR) versus Processing Instruction (PI) and Input Enhancement (IE) were imposed on forty low level Chinese learners of English. After a three-month treatment and test, the research found the PI+IE (Processing Instruction + Input Enhancement) group outperformed TI+RR (Traditional Instruction + Rote Rehearsal) group in terms of interpretation and production of target English phrasal verbs. Analysis of variance general English,English reading and writing for undergraduates showed a significant result suggesting the difficulty of learning phrasal verbs lies in its grammar structure, indicating a more prominent PI structured activity needs to be increased during instruction.
[private] See page: 10-46

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 14 Issue 1