Exploring a Summer English Language Camp Experience in China: A Descriptive Case Study

| February 5, 2006
Title
Exploring a Summer English Language Camp Experience in China: A Descriptive Case Study

Keywords: China, communicative competence, EFL, language camp

Authors
Mervyn J. Wighting, PhD
Assistant Professor of Education, Regent University

Deanna L. Nisbet, EdD
Assistant Professor of Education, Regent University

Evie R. Tindall, EdD
Associate Professor, Regent University

Bio Data
Dr. Mervyn Wighting, originally from the south of England, has considerable experience in the education of people from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and has taught in a variety of institutions in the United Kingdom and in Europe. Dr. Wighting has also worked in public and independent schools in the USA as a teacher and as an administrator, and is currently an assistant professor at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Dr. Deanna Nisbet is an assistant professor and director of the TESOL program in the School of Education at Regent University. She has more than 15 years experience teaching at the community college, undergraduate and graduate levels. Prior to entering the teaching profession, she worked in the fields of human resource development and marketing. Dr Nisbet s areas of expertise include first and second language acquisition and literacy for second language learners.

Dr. Evie Tindall is an associate professor who teaches in the TESOL program in the School of Education at Regent University. Her areas of expertise include reading and language arts, special populations, and teacher collaboration. Dr. Tindall has extensive experience as a teacher, consultant, and conference speaker.

Abstract
This paper reports on a descriptive study of a summer English language camp held in China. Chinese youths ages 8-18 were taught conversational English through a variety of classes and activities. Instructors were visiting teachers from the USA assisted by local Chinese teachers. Qualitative methods were used to gather data. Results indicate that the camp was beneficial to the students and to both groups of teachers. Recommendations for further study are included.

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Category: Teaching Articles, Volume 10