Models, Norms and Goals for English as an International Language Pedagogy and Task Based Language Teaching and Learning

| September 29, 2006
Title
Models, Norms and Goals for English as an International Language Pedagogy and Task Based Language Teaching and Learning

Keywords: World Englishes, Task Based Language Teaching

Authors
Ahmet Acar
Dokuz Eyli¼l University, Turkey

Bio Data
Ahmet Acar is a research assistant at Dokuz Eyli¼l University, Turkey, where he earned his M.A. degree and is currently a doctoral student. He has been to Syracuse University with a Fulbright scholarship, where he studied TESOL, theoretical linguistics, sociolinguistics, and taught Turkish as a foreign language to students at Syracuse University, Cornell University and Colgate University at the same time through multipoint videoconferencing, which was carried out the first time in the USA and was accepted as a successful pilot project. Acar’s research interests are the role of culture in language teaching, bilingualism, foreign and second language teaching methods, teaching languages from distance, ELT syllabus design and textbook evaluation.

Abstract
It is now a widely accepted phenomenon that English has spread to become a world language or a global lingua franca. Based on the increasing diversity in users and uses of English in cross-cultural settings at the present time, the assumptions of current approaches in ELT are currently being re-examined in literature. This paper aims to examine the theoretical assumptions and practices of task based language teaching and learning within the framework of English as an international language pedagogy taking into consideration the issues of innovations in the nativization process, the use of native norms as a point of reference, the status of non-native norms and the choice of a pedagogical model. Given the increasing importance of “mutual intelligibility” and “accommodation” in international interactions among English users from different backgrounds and of the studies in re conceptualization of competence in relation to EIL, the place of tasks in the curriculum is re-examined.

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See pages 174-191

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 8 Issue 3