On the Role of Emotional, Psychometric, and Verbal Intelligences in the Academic Achievement of University Students Majoring in English Language

| December 28, 2007
Title
On the Role of Emotional, Psychometric, and Verbal Intelligences in the Academic Achievement of University Students Majoring in English Language

Keywords: Academic achievement, Bar-on, EQ, IQ, VI, Wechsler

Authors
Mansoor Fahim (Ph.D.)
Allame Tabataba `i University, Iran

Reza Pishghadam (Ph.D.)
Ferdowsi University, Iran

Bio Data
Mansoor Fahim is associate professor in Allameh Tabatabaee University in Tehran, Iran, where is now Head of English Language Department. At present, he is teaching MA and Ph.D students some courses including Psycholinguistics, Theories of first and second language acquisition, Applied Linguistics. His research interests include issues in psycholinguistics.

Reza Pishghadam is assistant professor in Ferdowsi University in Mashhad, Iran, where he is Head of ESP department. At present, he is teaching psychometrics, Research methodology, language testing. His research interests are issues in language testing and psychometrics.

Abstract
Following innovations in the theories of intelligence and their radical changes from the unitary concept of intelligence (IQ) to the theory of multiple intelligences (MI), and especially the concept of emotional intelligence or emotional quotient (EQ), this study sought to find out whether emotional intelligence, psychometric intelligence and verbal intelligence (VI) have any role in the academic achievement of university students majoring in English language literature, teaching and translation. EQ, IQ, and VI data were matched with the students` academic records, at university at the end of second year. Predicting second language learning success from EQ and IQ variables produced divergent results depending on how the variables were operationalized.

When EQ variables were compared in groups (successful vs. unsuccessful) of individuals who had achieved very different levels of academic success, academic achievement was strongly associated with several dimensions of emotional intelligence (intrapersonal, stress management, and general mood competencies). When IQ variables were compared in groups (successful vs. unsuccessful) of individuals who had achieved very different levels of academic success, it was found that academic achievement did not correlate much with IQ but was strongly associated with VI which is a subsection of IQ tests. Results are discussed in the context of the importance of emotional, psychometric and verbal intelligences in second language learning.

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 9 Issue 4