One Page Plus, One More Character

| December 28, 2008
Title
One Page Plus, One More Character

Keywords: No Keyword

Authors
Pin-hsiang Natalie Wu and Wen-chi Wu
Chien-kuo Technology University, Taiwan

Bio Data
Dr. Pin-hsiang Natalie Wu (corresponding) is an assistant professor presently teaching at the Department of Applied Foreign Languages of Chien-kuo Technology University in Taiwan. She has been involved in British and American literature teaching, and also language teaching for many years. Her research interests include British and American literature and teaching literature. She is now bringing more student-centered activities into the classroom to motivate students for their love for literature.

Dr. Wen-chi Vivian Wu is an assistant professor currently teaching at the Department of Applied Foreign Languages of Chien-kuo Technology University in Taiwan. Her research interests include CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) and EFL Learning Environment. She is enthusiastic about combining language classroom with technology.

Abstract
This paper reports the advantages of adopting an innovative teaching method for literary learning in which the researchers integrated two activities into their literature class – One Page Plus and One More Character – in order to develop students awareness toward the literary themes of the stories read in class and motivate students to appreciate literature. Opposed to the traditional teacher-centered pedagogy where learners mainly depend on instructors for text-explanation, theme-exploration, and meaning-interpretation, learners become fully engaged in the activities described in this paper. With proper guidance from the teachers, students first were assigned specific topics for One Page Plus and One More Character activities. They then took turns expressing their ideas, listening to other members opinions, and discussing with their group members. Finally, students collaboratively wrote down the results of discussions. The two activities, providing students with opportunities to develop interpersonal communication skills generated from active engagement and positive interactions, are keys to successful literary learning.

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 10 Issue 4