Perceived Stress, Burnout and Coping Strategies of Native and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers in Japan

| August 12, 2014
Title
Perceived Stress, Burnout and Coping Strategies of Native and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers in Japan

Keywords: stress, burnout, coping strategies, NEST (Native English Speaking Teachers), NNEST (Non-native English Speaking Teachers)

Merissa Braza Ocampo
Independent Researcher, Japan

Kim Rockell
Aizu University, Japan

Bioprofiles:

Merissa Braza Ocampo is a Ph.D. graduate of Hokkaido University, Japan and TESOL Diploma holder. At present, she is active as an independent researcher and works as an ESL Educator in Japan. E-mail: merissa@yahoo.com

Kim Rockell is a Ph.D. graduate of University of Canterbury and presently an associate professor at Aizu University, Japan. He is an ethnomusicologist and ESL educator. E-mail: kimusiknz@gmail.com

 

 

Abstract

Due to a variety of work pressures, teachers face different types of stress. However, the many mental health related issues that teachers of English face are often ignored. Focusing on teachers of ESL in contemporary Japan, this study affirms the existence of stress as a definite problem and identifies and a range of coping strategies that are being applied. Differences between the way native and non-native English speaking teachers deal with stress are examined. Although both groups share certain significant stressors, the study shows that each group tends to apply a contrasting set of coping strategies. These findings help to streamline approaches that assist teachers in coping with stress and have clear implications for teacher training curricula design.

See page: 16-26

Download PDF

Category: Teaching Articles