Korean College Students’ Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Learning English as a Foreign Language

| September 8, 2013
Title
Korean College Students’ Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Learning English as a Foreign Language

Keywords: College students, self-regulation, self-efficacy, English language learner, strategy.

Author
Chuang Wang, Do-Hong Kim, Mimi Bong, & Hyun Seon Ahn
University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA & Korea University, Korea

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to: Dr. Chuang Wang, Associate Professor of Educational Research, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; 9201 University City Blvd, Charlotte, NC, 28223, USA. Phone: (704) 687-8708; email: cwang15@uncc.edu

Bio
Chuang Wang’s research interests include self-efficacy beliefs and self-regulated learning strategies, learning English as a second or foreign language, educational research design and data analysis.

Do-Hong Kim’s research program has centered on various aspects of validity in both educational and psychological testing and assessment.

Mimi Bong is Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director of bMRI (Brain and Motivation Research Institute) at Korea University. Her research focuses on adolescent motivation with particular emphases on self-efficacy beliefs and achievement goals.

Hyun Seon Ahn is currently a Ph.D. student at Korea University. Her research interests include self-efficacy beliefs and classroom goal structures.

The contribution of Mimi Bong and Hyun Seon Ahn to this research was made possible by the WCU (World Class University) Program funded by the Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, consigned to the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (Grant no. R32-2008-000-20023-0).

Abstract
This study investigates the relationship between self-efficacy, self-regulation, and English language proficiency for Korean college students. College students (n = 220) attending a major university in Korea responded to two instruments, one on their self-efficacy beliefs and the other on their use of self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies in English. Examination of the reliability and validity of the instruments was followed by a path model representing positive and significant relationships between self-efficacy, SRL strategies, and English proficiency measured by a standardized English test. Multivariate analysis of variance and t-tests revealed group differences: (a) female students reported higher levels of self-efficacy beliefs, more frequent use of SRL strategies, and higher English proficiency; (b) undergraduate students reported higher levels of self-efficacy beliefs and higher English proficiency than graduate students but their use of SRL strategies did not differ significantly; and (c) participants did not differ in their use of a test-taking strategy (reading the questions before reading the text versus reading the text before reading the questions), and this test-taking strategy did not make a difference in participants’ performance on the standardized English test, either. Implications of the findings were discussed in the context of classroom teaching.
[private] See page: 81-112
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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 15 Issue 3