Choice and Its Influence on Intrinsic Motivation and Output In Task-Based Language Teaching

| March 11, 2013
Title
Choice and Its Influence on Intrinsic Motivation and Output In Task-Based Language Teaching

Keywords: Affect, choice, task-based language teaching, accuracy, complexity, fluency

Authors
John Thurman
Otaru University of Commerce, Hokkaido, Japan

Bio Data
John Thurman has been working in Japan for 25 years. He is very interested in the confluence of motivation and task-based language teaching. He has presented on these topics in the USA, China, Europe, and New Zealand. He is currently working at Otaru University of Commerce, located in Hokkaido, Japan.

Abstract
The first aim of this study is to examine whether the existence of choice of a task topic, compared to when there is no choice of topic, has a positive effect on participants’ interest (Task Interest) and self-efficacy (Task Self-efficacy) while conducting a descriptive type of task. The second aim of this paper is to examine whether the oral output of the participants (Time on Task, Accuracy, Complexity, and Fluency) while they conducted the task increased due to the implementation of choice. Data from two sessions was collected; one without and one with the choice implemented pre-task. Survey (N = 143) data elicited after the task was collected, in addition to production data collected while a smaller sample conducted the same task. Results of each collection of data were analyzed utilizing t-tests for between-subjects data. Results of the survey data indicated that Task Interest was greater for the limited choice of topic treatment than the no choice of topic treatment, but not statistically significant. Results of the production data indicated that Time on Task was significantly greater for the choice of topic treatment than for the no choice of topic treatment, possibly indicating greater intrinsic motivation when choice is available. Lastly, Complexity was significantly greater for the choice of topic treatment than for the no choice of topic treatment, possibly indicating greater complexity in the oral output of the participants when choice is available. Implications for these results are indicated for task design, task implementation, and cross-cultural psychological research.
[private] See page: 202-245

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 15 Issue 1