Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Asian Learners and Users going Beyond Traditional Frameworks

| March 11, 2013
Title
Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Asian Learners and Users going Beyond Traditional Frameworks

Keywords: Computer assisted language learning, mobile assisted language use, Asian learners, tutorial CALL, connectivism

Authors
Huw Jarvis
University of Salford, Salford, United Kingdom

Bio Data
Huw Jarvis is a senior lecturer in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). He has published widely in technology in language education and is the editor of www.TESOLacademic.org which disseminates TESOL-based research via free video webcasts.

Abstract
Traditional frameworks for understanding Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), whilst still useful, are today nevertheless somewhat limited for a variety of reasons, and in many respects, it is the practices of Asian learners and users that are driving forward the need for new thinking in this area. This discussion paper provides an articulation of where such frameworks are located, what they have offered and why we now need to go beyond them. It provides an historical critique of the theory and practice of CALL and then goes on to draw on some of the author’s most recent studies, which examine the practices of non-native speaker students of English (NNSSoE) working in independent study contexts. The narrative leads to a proposal that Mobile Assisted Language Use (MALU), together with an educational theory of connectivism, may now provide a better framework for examining technology in self-access centres and elsewhere. This argument, as will become apparent, is being driven in significant measure by the practices of learners and other users from Asia.
[private] See page: 190-201

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Category: Quarterly Journal, Volume 15 Issue 1